How to prevent the pitfalls of Predatory Publishing


  • As the prevalence of Open Access publishing continues to increase, the threat from a growing list of ‘predatory publishers’ is closely following.

No need to call in Arnie just yet, because we’ve discovered a great online resource to ensure that you don’t fall victim.

A Colorado librarian has compiled a blacklist of suspicious journal publishers, self-titled ‘Beall’s List’. This growing list currently exposes over 400 dubious Open Access publishers with poor ethical, editorial and peer-review practices in place.

These publishers spam professional mailing lists, targeting unsuspecting academics who are eager to have their work published. They exploit the ‘author-pays’ model and usually promise quick turnaround times to have the article reviewed, accepted and published.

How do I avoid ‘predatory publishing’?

  1. 1. Consult Beall’s List – it is the generally recognised standard that librarians check against.
  2. 2. If the publisher isn’t on the list, check out Beall’s Criteria for Determining Predatory Open Access Publishers and do some investigating yourself.
  3. 3. If you need further advice on where to publish contact your Academic Services Librarian.

Please share this important information with your colleagues.

These suspicious folks don’t stop at predatory publishing they are also trying to exploit you with bogus impact factor sites. Read more about bogus impact factor sites in September’s issue of INSight.


4 Comments on “How to prevent the pitfalls of Predatory Publishing”

  1. What are the issues associated with these publishers? Financial loss? Loss of credibility? Losing rights to publish elsewhere?

  2. […] month we gave you the lowdown on predatory publishers – Open Access publishers with poor ethical, editorial and peer-review practices who exploit […]

  3. […] 6. How to prevent the pitfalls of predatory publishing […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s