Cyber security – is your business everyone’s business?

We don’t all own a Marty McFly hoverboard, but it is 2017 and we do live in a technologically advanced and digitally connected world.

We increasingly embrace digital models for study, research, teaching, social and finance activities. Inevitably, and unfortunately, digital risks follow us.

The recent alert on the Blueborne Bluetooth vulnerability is a great example of this.

It’s not a mix of Blue Steel and Jason Bourne, (however we’re totally lining up for that movie!). Blueborne is the latest Bluetooth vulnerability that could be violating your digital world.

Blueborne has the potential to impact billions of devices, including computers, laptops, phones, and work and home devices.

It allows a person with the right tools, and who is within Bluetooth range of your ‘smart’ tech, to gain control over your device without any action from you.

Excuse me while my inner techy geek gets a little excited by how cool that is…. Alas, it is also pretty dangerous and threatening too.

That threat, and the evolution of the Internet of Things, is why we all need to take an active role in our own cyber security.

Australia, along with an increasing number of other countries, have adopted a cybersecurity awareness theme for the month of October. National Cybersecurity Awareness Month is growing internationally as a global concerted effort to keep us cyber safe.

Cybersecurity is everyone’s responsibility. And as part of improving awareness, Griffith University have recently launched a new cybersecurity website. This will be progressively updated with information and advice.

It is your one stop shop for staying safe online: tips, guidance, contacts and training videos. So, spread the word and stay tuned for more.


Disaster Recovery testing

While some very lucky staff are off on trimester vacay, we’re taking the opportunity to complete the annual IT disaster recovery test. We’re putting our Scouts hat on, ‘Be Prepared’.

For those fortunate enough to be on the beach in Bali, you can continue sipping your cocktail knowing we’ve got your covered. You can trust that we’re on the ball, executing a fail-over test in the case of a major disaster.

The disaster recovery test is a major activity to ensure the University’s key information systems can be recovered and continue to operate in the event of a major disruption.

This year’s testing includes

  • A major site fail-over test simulating the loss of all in-house hosted systems. During this test period, access to all systems and associated links including access to the Griffith home page and internet will be unavailable.
  • Testing the fail-over capability of our critical telephone systems, student printing system and SharePoint document repository. During this test period, access to these systems could be interrupted.

When?

The date and times and subject to change (it’s always in the small print) but currently, the date and times are:

  1. Sunday 22 October 2017
  • In-house hosted systems (including internet and wi-fi access)
    8am – noon
  • Telephones, student printing and SharePoint
    8am – midnight

While this may cause some inconvenience, these tests are required and you will receive more information as the date gets closer.

For further information, please contact Sudath Wijeratne.  More information about scheduled maintenance for the remainder of 2017 is available in the Maintenance Calendar.


Are you a researcher interested in High Performance Computing?

High Performance Computing (HPC) refers to the practice of aggregating computing power in a way that delivers much higher performance than one could get out of a typical desktop computer or workstation in order to solve large problems in science, engineering, or business.

As a researcher at Griffith University, you have access to a number of HPC systems, including:

Euramoo

QRIScloud
Euramoo is the QRIScloud “Cluster-as-a-Service” offering. It provides a batch scheduler environment and is pre-populated with a range of computational application software.

The hardware and configuration of Euramoo are optimised for running multiple independent jobs each using a single processing core. It is ideally suited to large parameter sweep or ensemble applications.

See the Euramoo User Guide for assistance.

Gowonda

Griffith University
Griffith University’s High Performance Computing Facility is a 792 core HPC cluster and consists of a mixture of SGI Altix XE and SGI® Rackable™ C2114-4TY14 servers. These servers are interconnected by a very high speed network (infiniband) this provides a suitable platform for running highly parallelised jobs (mpi). It is managed by eResearch Services.

Gowonda is used to run computations that require large amount of computing resources (CPU, RAM, hard disk). All Griffith University researchers and researchers from QCIF affiliated institutions have access to Gowonda.

See the Gowonda HPC User Guide for assistance.

Flashlight

Research Computing Centre, UQ
FlashLite has been designed explicitly for Australian research to conduct data intensive science and innovation.

FlashLite supports applications that need large amounts of memory or very high performance memory and optimises data movement within the machine.

FlashLite has been designed to support data intensive applications, which are neither well served by traditional supercomputers (Gowonda) nor by modern cloud-based data centres (AWS).

Where can I go for help?

You can contact Griffith University, HPC Systems Engineer, Indy Siva or attend Hacky Hour.


What can you do in September to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 10 (4 September – 8 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Thu 7/9 1:00pm Managing your research data N53 1.49 Nathan

Week 11 (11 September – 15 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 12/9 1:00pm Editing your writing N53 1.51 Nathan
Wed 13/9 10:00am Improving writing quality before submission G10 2.25 Gold Coast
Fri 15/9 10:00am Endnote N53 1.50 Nathan

Week 12 (18 September – 22 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 19/9 10:00am Strategic publishing N53 1.49 Nathan
Wed 20/9 1:00pm  Editing your writing G10 2.25 Gold Coast

Week 13 (25 September – 29 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 25/9 10:00am Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Wed 27/9 1:00pm Improving writing quality before submission N53 1.51 Nathan

What can you do in August to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 5 (31 July – 4 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 1/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 3/8 9:30am Online research survey tool N53 1.50 Nathan
Fri 4/8
1:00pm
Academic writing expectations at the HDR level S07 2.18 South Bank

 

Week 6 (7 August – 11 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 7/8 10:00am Endnote S02 3.13 South Bank
Wed 9/8 1:00pm Managing information resources and writing your literature review G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 7 (14 August – 18 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 14/8 10:00am Build and leverage your research profile N53 1.49 Nathan
Fri 18/8 10:00am Strategic publishing G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 8 (21 August – 25 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 22/8 10:00am Endnote N53 1.50 Nathan
Wed 23/8 1:00pm Developing your academic argument G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 9 (28 August – 1 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 28/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 31/8 10:00am Managing information resources and writing your literature review
N53 1.51
Nathan

What to do when retiring your old mobile device

Have you recently upgraded your mobile phone, or are you thinking about it in the near future?

With the continual innovation of new technology, the life expectancy of your mobile device can be as short as three years before you need to update – or maybe you elect to update sooner to stay on top of the newest releases.

So what should you do with your old device? Recycle it, of course!

Griffith is committed to finding sustainable solutions for our end of life electronics as part of our E-Waste and Sustainability campaign. To facilitate this, there are E-Waste recycling stations at each campus library, as well as the EcoCentre and various student centres.

However, just as you wouldn’t leave a public computer without logging out of all your personal accounts, don’t forget to remove your personal data from your mobile device before disposing of it!

Lately, there has been an increase in the number of phones being dropped off to be recycled that still have access to the owner’s highly confidential data: private text messages, personal photos, online accounts and even banking passwords!  

To avoid the risk of having your accounts hacked or money stolen, it’s important to ensure you remove your personal data before your recycle.

Simply follow the checklist below, then get recycling!

  • Back up the device
  • Manually remove any personal information (a factory reset does not necessary delete all personal information)
  • Log out of online accounts  (iCloud, iTunes, App Store, Google Play, etc) and social media (Facebook, Instagram)
  • Manually turn off any ‘find my phone’ applications (i.e. Find my iPhone and Android Device Manager)
  • Unpair any devices such as Car Media or iWatch
  • Perform a factory reset
  • Remove your SIM card

For further information on the data management of your device before recycling visit the Recycling Devices webpage, or take a look at the tips on the Mobile Muster, Apple iOS, or Android websites.


New Interlibrary Loan Request form and website

New interlibrary loan request form and website

Did you know you can request books and articles from non-Griffith libraries?

That’s right! You can borrow items from other university libraries, council libraries, hospital libraries, government libraries, and almost any other type of library you can think of.

The process has always been pretty simple. You just have to be a Griffith staff member, or postgraduate student and submit a request using our online form.

If you’ve ever requested an Interlibrary Loan (ILL), you’ll know just how easy it is. But we have made some changes recently.

The Library has changed its ILL request form and website. This is due to improvements to underlying systems that will be taking place over the coming months.

To request an interlibrary loan, head to the new ILL website. If you have requested but not yet downloaded items from the ZPortal, please do so before 31 August 2017.

For further information, please contact library@griffith.edu.au