What can you do in August to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 5 (31 July – 4 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 1/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 3/8 9:30am Online research survey tool N53 1.50 Nathan
Fri 4/8
1:00pm
Academic writing expectations at the HDR level S07 2.18 South Bank

 

Week 6 (7 August – 11 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 7/8 10:00am Endnote S02 3.13 South Bank
Wed 9/8 1:00pm Managing information resources and writing your literature review G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 7 (14 August – 18 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 14/8 10:00am Build and leverage your research profile N53 1.49 Nathan
Fri 18/8 10:00am Strategic publishing G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 8 (21 August – 25 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 22/8 10:00am Endnote N53 1.50 Nathan
Wed 23/8 1:00pm Developing your academic argument G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 9 (28 August – 1 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 28/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 31/8 10:00am Managing information resources and writing your literature review
N53 1.51
Nathan

Griffith has launched a new Cisco Networking Academy program

Have you heard the joke about the IPv6 packet that walked into a bar? Nobody talked to it.

Get it? Me neither! But our Griffith IT students get it, and now that Griffith provides a Cisco Networking Academy program, they are laughing all the way to a rewarding career in computer networking.

The Cisco Academy program is an initiative undertaken by the School of ICT, in association with Information Services (INS) and Campus Life.

It is designed to provide a comprehensive knowledge of networking technologies that are necessary for a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA).

The program outline includes:

  • Network Design Fundamentals
  • Networking devices and protocols
  • Local Area Network (LAN)
  • Network Security

We’ve completed two, new, built-for-purpose labs at Gold Coast and Nathan campuses to support the program.

They promote a learning environment designed to challenge problem-solving and analytical skills when applied to the fundamental concepts of networking.

Our labs provide cutting edge technology for IT students with an aptitude to design, build and maintain computer networks.

Find out more about Griffith’s Cisco Networking Academy course offerings and timetables.


A quick Q&A with Professor Kathy Andrews

Professor Kathy Andrews

Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery (GRIDD), Professor Kathy Andrews discusses her career, research tips and writing a children’s book.

1. What did you want to be when you were growing up?
I wanted to be so many things when I was growing up! An artist, an author and a scientist. In the end, I was able to mix some of these things together into one great job. Being a scientist is very creative and involves not only solving interesting questions but also communicating your findings to other scientists and the public.

2. Tell us about a previous job (work experience/volunteer work) that you’ve had.
My first job was wrapping presents at Christmas time in a department store!

3. Which 3 apps do you use the most on your mobile device?
iBooks (because I read constantly), Notes (to remind myself of things) and Twitter (still getting used to this one)

4. Which 5 celebrities would you invite to your ultimate dinner party?
That’s a hard one. If my daughter was involved, I would have to say five members of the Firebirds netball team!

5. Tell us about your favourite fictional character.
I don’t have particular favourites, but I am quite taken by the elven characters in Lord of the Rings.

6. What’s the best thing about your current role?
The best thing about my current role is the diversity of things that I am involved in. I work with fantastic staff and students on exciting research projects focused on developing new medicines for malaria, teach undergraduate students about infectious diseases and also talk to people in the community about how great science is.

7. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I hope that in five years I will have developed a new type of antimalarial drug. Fingers crossed!

8. What’s been the highlight of your career so far?
The highlight of my career really is in seeing my amazing research students graduate and go on to do wonderful things with their lives and careers. Very rewarding!

9. You are involved in Griffith’s That’s Rad Science project. Tell us about that.
I have always been involved in science communication and in 2016 I decided to try something new that also combined my skills in project management and writing. I wanted to inspire as many children as possible by telling them about the amazing worlds of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). I started That’s RAD! Science with the vision of producing a series of 12 books authored by Queenslanders working in STEM areas. The aim is to distribute the books widely to primary school children and interest them in STEM from an early age. I am authoring the first book about parasites (think pet poo parasites, scratchy head lice, and malaria mini-vampire parasites!)

10. What wise advice do you have for new researchers?
Make sure you find something you are passionate about to work on!

11. What’s the best resource you’ve discovered in your Griffith University Library?
The best Griffith University Library resource has to be the ability access online journal articles. When I started as a scientist, I often had to order articles and wait several weeks for them to arrive by post!

12. Can you give us your 3 best research tips?
Take detailed notes, set aside time to think about your research project what it means, and think outside the box as you never know what you might find!


What can you do in July to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 1 (3 July – 7 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Thu 6/7 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 2 (10 July – 14 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 11/7 10:00am Managing your research data G10 2.09 Gold Coast
Fri 14/7 10:00am Academic writing expectations at the HDR level N53 1.51 Nathan

 

Week 3 (17 July – 21 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 17/7 10:00am Endnote N53 1.49 Nathan
Wed 19/7 1:00pm Academic writing expectations at the HDR level G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 4 (24 July – 28 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 25/7 9:30am Online research survey tool G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Wed 26/7 10:00am Developing your academic argument N53 1.51 Nathan
Thu 27/7 1:00pm Build and leverage your research profile G10 2.09 Gold Coast

Copyright plays a supporting role in a Griffith film course

Did you know Information Services was involved in the creation of an online course for Griffith’s Film School? Information Policy Officer, Antony Ley lent his copyright expertise to the development of the online Asia Pacific Film course.

The course covers cinema from China (Hong Kong, Mainland, Taiwan), Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia), Japan, India, and Western Asia (Turkey, Iran, Israel, Lebanon) as well as Australia.

Convened by Dr Margaret McVeigh, the online Asia Pacific Film course was developed by Dr Anne Demy-Geroe, in consultation with Phillip Cheah.

With over 100 online presentations, complemented by 15 full feature films, 150 plus film clips, and multiple interviews with Asia Pacific directors, the course presented unique copyright opportunities and challenges.

According to Antony, the ‘inclusion of so many film clips was integral to the course, and of particular concern to the course developers.

‘Given the nature of the films and clips, most were not available under commercial licence or were not covered by existing database licences’.

So how did they obtain the film clips? Antony said some of the films were ordered from other Universities and used under Part VA of the Copyright Act (Screenrights licence), some used under Section 49 (Criticism and Review), and some under the recently added “Special Case Exception” (s200AB) of the Copyright Act.

‘Fortunately, many of the directors, actors and producers personally gave Anne pre-release copies (which had no technological protection) at Film festivals she ran and attended’.

‘So the Technological Protection Measures sections in the Copyright Act which often frustrate the use of s200AB, were not applicable to the majority of the content under consideration,’ Antony said.


Do you know about the Referencing Tool?

Wouldn’t it be great if there was an online tool that could help you structure your references? As luck would have it, there is. And it was developed by the best University ever! Your University. Griffith University.

Meet the Griffith University Referencing Tool.

Using the referencing tool is as easy as 1, 2, 3! You simply select your reference style, media type and format and the handy little tool will give you an example for both the in-text citation and reference list entry.

It’s quite genius really. And the big news is, the tool recently had a makeover. And not just cosmetic either.

Yes, it does look prettier (which to be honest is always important) but it also has improved functionality.

It’s now mobile device friendly so you can reference on the go. Are you pondering how to reference that journal article while you are on the train?

Simply, whip out your mobile phone, open the referencing tool, and get the answer you need.

Do you need to print out a referencing example from the tool? You totally can. The redeveloped tool now gives you further printing options. We know you still like to consult a print copy once in awhile (#oldschool).

For those of you who used the old referencing tool, don’t worry. The new one still has the same layout so you won’t have to relearn how to use it (not that it’s hard!).


Did you know digitised readings have an expiry date?

Milk has an expiry date. And so do your digitised readings.

Trimester 2 has started! Students are back on campus and will be accessing their course materials as we speak.

Conveners, have you checked your course Reading Lists to ensure all your digitised chapters and articles have been requested?

Digitised materials have a start and end date to reflect the beginning and end of a Trimester (or other relevant time periods).

This means all digitisations have an expiry date and your students cannot access these readings until you request them for the new time period.

The Digitisation How-to-Guide will take you through the process.

eBooks and electronic journal articles which link out to publisher websites (the resources with the red online button) do not need to be re-requested.