What can you do in August to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 5 (31 July – 4 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 1/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 3/8 9:30am Online research survey tool N53 1.50 Nathan
Fri 4/8
1:00pm
Academic writing expectations at the HDR level S07 2.18 South Bank

 

Week 6 (7 August – 11 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 7/8 10:00am Endnote S02 3.13 South Bank
Wed 9/8 1:00pm Managing information resources and writing your literature review G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 7 (14 August – 18 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 14/8 10:00am Build and leverage your research profile N53 1.49 Nathan
Fri 18/8 10:00am Strategic publishing G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 8 (21 August – 25 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 22/8 10:00am Endnote N53 1.50 Nathan
Wed 23/8 1:00pm Developing your academic argument G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 9 (28 August – 1 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 28/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 31/8 10:00am Managing information resources and writing your literature review
N53 1.51
Nathan

How to boost your productivity

Are you drowning in constant emails, phone calls, paperwork, interruptions and meeting actions? You need to work smarter.

Now, if you’re looking at us to give you some tips on how to do this, let me set you straight. We all need to learn to work smarter. Yes, even us.

And since we didn’t have the answers, we went searching and come up trumps with this handy little eBook in our Books 24×7 database:

Smart Work is the busy professional’s guide to getting organised in the digital workplace.

This book ‘throws you a lifeline by showing you how to take advantage of your digital tools to reprioritise, refocus and get back to doing the important work’.

According to Smart Work, one way to boost productivity is to reduce email noise (Chapter 4):

Minimise the emails hitting your inbox
Manage the amount of information and junk emails in your inbox by setting up filing rules, unsubscribing from distributions lists (when they add no value) and reporting spam.

Turn off email alerts
Research ‘suggests that the intrusion of constant email alerts causes a loss of focus and can lead to our concentration work taking one-third longer to complete’.

Check email proactively
Schedule time to check your emails. Crowley suggests you should ‘aim to put aside two, maybe three blocks of time during each day to process your emails’.

Batch information emails to be reviewed later
Keep all your valuable, not time-critical, information emails in one convenient location. Simply, create a separate folder and use either a manual or an automated strategy to direct relevant mail into it. Then, just allocate time to read the messages.

Delete decisively
Be ruthless.

Manage other people’s expectations
When you receive an email that isn’t a priority for you, be sure to set a clear expectation about the work and when you will be able to do it. The SSSH strategy can help you with this (see Chapter 4 for details).


What can you do in July to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 1 (3 July – 7 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Thu 6/7 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 2 (10 July – 14 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 11/7 10:00am Managing your research data G10 2.09 Gold Coast
Fri 14/7 10:00am Academic writing expectations at the HDR level N53 1.51 Nathan

 

Week 3 (17 July – 21 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 17/7 10:00am Endnote N53 1.49 Nathan
Wed 19/7 1:00pm Academic writing expectations at the HDR level G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 4 (24 July – 28 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 25/7 9:30am Online research survey tool G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Wed 26/7 10:00am Developing your academic argument N53 1.51 Nathan
Thu 27/7 1:00pm Build and leverage your research profile G10 2.09 Gold Coast

How to hold an effective meeting

Have you ever been to a meeting that made you want to crawl under the desk and take a snooze? It just went on and on and on… and nothing was really achieved.

Of course, this doesn’t happen in your current job. Meetings are short, sharp and effective where you work (because your boss is awesome!). But in other workplaces, meetings can be a drag.

And for that reason, we thought we’d share this handy video, aptly titled Effective Meetings (New York, NY: Inc., 2014) from the Business Education in Video database.

It only goes for six minutes and offers a few insights from CEOs and business owners on how to effectively run a meeting.

We quite like the tip from the Owner of Gainesville Health & Fitness Centre, Joe Cirulli, about holding strategic meetings offsite. The Whitsundays, perhaps?

Joe also suggests:

  • Keep short-term goals meetings separate from long-term strategy meetings
  • Hold short and frequent operational meetings
  • Build strategic meetings around long-term planning

The Business Education in Video database contains over 3,000 streamed video titles from producers such as Bloomberg, CRM Learning, BBC and Seven Dimensions that the library has purchased.

This database is part of the Alexander Street Streamed Video Collection. Other databases in the Streamed Collection include:


Do you know about the Referencing Tool?

Wouldn’t it be great if there was an online tool that could help you structure your references? As luck would have it, there is. And it was developed by the best University ever! Your University. Griffith University.

Meet the Griffith University Referencing Tool.

Using the referencing tool is as easy as 1, 2, 3! You simply select your reference style, media type and format and the handy little tool will give you an example for both the in-text citation and reference list entry.

It’s quite genius really. And the big news is, the tool recently had a makeover. And not just cosmetic either.

Yes, it does look prettier (which to be honest is always important) but it also has improved functionality.

It’s now mobile device friendly so you can reference on the go. Are you pondering how to reference that journal article while you are on the train?

Simply, whip out your mobile phone, open the referencing tool, and get the answer you need.

Do you need to print out a referencing example from the tool? You totally can. The redeveloped tool now gives you further printing options. We know you still like to consult a print copy once in awhile (#oldschool).

For those of you who used the old referencing tool, don’t worry. The new one still has the same layout so you won’t have to relearn how to use it (not that it’s hard!).


Does torture work?

Photo of hands in handcuffs

Well, you’ll have to read John W. Schiemann’s book to find out.

In his 2015 publication, Does Torture Work?, Schiemann ‘examines whether interrogational torture is effective in obtaining valuable information and at what cost in terms of torture’s brutality and frequency’ (taken from abstract).

According to the abstract, the book ‘draws on historical accounts, previously secret CIA documents in the war on terrorism, and the proposals advanced by torture proponents to build a game theoretic model of interrogational torture’.

‘Illustrating the model outcomes with narratives from Pinochet’s Chile to Algeria to the use of enhanced interrogation techniques against Al Qaeda operatives at CIA black sites, the book compares the results of the model with proponent benchmarks on information reliability, torture frequency, and torture severity’.

In his book, Schiemann shows that ‘interrogational torture fails to reliably generate valuable information but will be both more frequent and more brutal than proponents expect and are willing to accept. Having shown that interrogational torture is ineffective, the book then demonstrates just why and how it fails’.

You can read this book online via the Oxford Scholarship Online: Political Science database.

The database contains the full text and abstracts of classic and newly published Oxford books in the areas of political science – from Comparative Politics to Political Theory, International Relations to European Union Studies.


What can you do in June to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to calendar.

Study Week (29 May – 2 June)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
1/6 10:00am Copyright, plagiarism and publishing integrity G10 2.25 Gold Coast
2/6 1:00pm Track, measure and demonstrate impact G10 2.09 Gold Coast

 

Exam Week 1 (5 June – 9 June)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
7/6 10:00am Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

 Student Vacation (19 June – 23 June)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
21/6 10:00am Endnote N53 1.49 Nathan