6 of the best photo editing apps for mobile devices

apps

You may not think you need a photo editing app on your device. But you do. There are so many situations that require you to take a photo on your phone – that will ultimately be seen by other people.

Whether you need a profile photo for LinkedIn or some snaps of an important work function, it’s important that the photos you take are presentable. And sometimes your device just doesn’t take a photo that does justice to your amazing photography skills.

Here are six photo editing apps you can use on your mobile device. Most of them are free!

Adobe Photoshop Fix
Developer: Adobe
Available: App Store and Google Play
Cost: Free
Adobe Photoshop Fix enables powerful, yet easy image retouching and restoration on your iPad or iPhone. Heal, smooth, liquefy, lighten and make other edits and adjustments that give you the precise look you’re after.

VSCO
Developer: Visual Supply Company
Available: App Store and Google Play
Cost: Free
VSCO is a photo editing and publishing tool that offers dozens of exclusive filters and presets. Each of the presets can be tweaked which means there is an almost infinite number of actual filters.

Snapseed
Developer: Google
Available: App Store and Google Play
Cost: Free
This photo editing app provides the precision and control of professional photo editing software. It features non-destructive editing workflow and the ability to selectively apply edits with brushes, masks, and control points. Snapseed was rated as one of The 100 Best Android Apps of 2017 by PC Magazine.

Facetune 2
Developer: Lightricks
Available: App Store
Cost: Free
The next generation of the award-winning Facetune app is here with a new, amazing collection of the best pro retouching features. There’s super advanced technology behind every fun, powerful and easy-to-use tool. In only a few taps, you can whiten teeth, remove blemishes, smooth out skin, slim faces—and so much more!

AfterFocus
Developer: MotionOne.com
Available: App Store and Google Play
Cost: $1.49
With AfterFocus, you can create a DSLR-style background blurred photo by simply selecting the focus area. Also, various filter effects offer you the ability to create the most natural and realistic photo.

TouchRetouch
Developer: Adva-Soft
Available: App Store and Google Play
Cost: $2.99
TouchRetouch offers you all the tools you need to efficiently remove unwanted content from your photos. Remove photo bombers, surface breaks and scratches, skin blemishes or objects like poles and trash cans!


How to write a tweetable abstract

twitter

Just when you have finally mastered how to write a coherent and concise abstract for your research paper, publishers have changed things up. A number of publishers also now require a ‘tweetable abstract’.

 

Tweetable abstracts should provide the main conclusions or the key message of a paper in a way that is easily understood.

A common mistake made by academics in writing tweetable abstracts is not using tags or hashtags. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, Assistant Editor, Samantha Ponton said ‘very few authors use the symbols ‘@’ and ‘#’ in their tweetable abstracts, to refer to an author’s Twitter username or to tag a keyword, respectively’.

‘Hashtags can be used to increase the visibility of a tweet, as users can search Twitter for keywords using this symbol as a prefix, for example, #ecology or #statistics’ she said (Submission requirement aims to boost social media engagement, 2013).

Other common mistakes include using overly technical scientific jargon and superfluous hashtags, or exceeding the character limit (How Twitter Literacy Can Benefit Conservation Scientists, 2013)

Not sure how to write for Twitter? Check out this helpful guide from the University of Pennsylvania. Or the 2014 BRW article 14 tips for getting the most out of Twitter Audience Platform.

Further information
Social media library guide
This guide provides links to helpful social media resources online and in the library.

Griffith University Social Media Guidelines
These guidelines outline the University principles concerning the use of social media and provide advice that assists staff in establishing and using social media spaces. They are framed within the University policies relating to conduct, copyright and intellectual property, privacy, use of information technology and information security.


6 ways to cut back on your iPhone data usage

Photo of iPhone

Do you love your iPhone, but hate the amount data you’re churning through? We can help! Check out our handy tips and tricks to reduce the mobile data usage on your iPhone.

Android devices have similar data saving capabilities – just check your online manual for details.

1. Disable Wi-Fi assist
Wi-Fi assist lets you stay connected to the Internet when Wi-Fi signal strength is weak by automatically switching over to mobile data.

2. Disable Background App Refresh
Background app refresh automatically updates your app content. But fear not, you can disable this function and it may even help with your battery life.

3. Disable automatic downloads
Purchased something new from iTunes on a different device? You can select to download it to your iPhone via Wi-Fi only.

4. Turn off cellular data usage for iCloud
If you use iCloud to transfer documents and data, it could be syncing using your mobile network and draining your data.

5. Avoid streaming high-quality music
Apple has created the option to stream high-quality music regardless of your being on Wi-Fi or mobile data. The higher the quality, the more data is needed to stream!

6. Disable auto play videos on apps
Some social media apps such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Vine and Twitter automatically play videos which can use a lot of data. Switch off auto-play via the app settings.

Head to the Mobile Phones Self Help page to find out how to turn off these settings, improve your mobile coverage and more!


A quick Q&A with Professor Kathy Andrews

Professor Kathy Andrews

Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery (GRIDD), Professor Kathy Andrews discusses her career, research tips and writing a children’s book.

1. What did you want to be when you were growing up?
I wanted to be so many things when I was growing up! An artist, an author and a scientist. In the end, I was able to mix some of these things together into one great job. Being a scientist is very creative and involves not only solving interesting questions but also communicating your findings to other scientists and the public.

2. Tell us about a previous job (work experience/volunteer work) that you’ve had.
My first job was wrapping presents at Christmas time in a department store!

3. Which 3 apps do you use the most on your mobile device?
iBooks (because I read constantly), Notes (to remind myself of things) and Twitter (still getting used to this one)

4. Which 5 celebrities would you invite to your ultimate dinner party?
That’s a hard one. If my daughter was involved, I would have to say five members of the Firebirds netball team!

5. Tell us about your favourite fictional character.
I don’t have particular favourites, but I am quite taken by the elven characters in Lord of the Rings.

6. What’s the best thing about your current role?
The best thing about my current role is the diversity of things that I am involved in. I work with fantastic staff and students on exciting research projects focused on developing new medicines for malaria, teach undergraduate students about infectious diseases and also talk to people in the community about how great science is.

7. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I hope that in five years I will have developed a new type of antimalarial drug. Fingers crossed!

8. What’s been the highlight of your career so far?
The highlight of my career really is in seeing my amazing research students graduate and go on to do wonderful things with their lives and careers. Very rewarding!

9. You are involved in Griffith’s That’s Rad Science project. Tell us about that.
I have always been involved in science communication and in 2016 I decided to try something new that also combined my skills in project management and writing. I wanted to inspire as many children as possible by telling them about the amazing worlds of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). I started That’s RAD! Science with the vision of producing a series of 12 books authored by Queenslanders working in STEM areas. The aim is to distribute the books widely to primary school children and interest them in STEM from an early age. I am authoring the first book about parasites (think pet poo parasites, scratchy head lice, and malaria mini-vampire parasites!)

UPDATE: Check out Kathy’s book launch.

10. What wise advice do you have for new researchers?
Make sure you find something you are passionate about to work on!

11. What’s the best resource you’ve discovered in your Griffith University Library?
The best Griffith University Library resource has to be the ability access online journal articles. When I started as a scientist, I often had to order articles and wait several weeks for them to arrive by post!

12. Can you give us your 3 best research tips?
Take detailed notes, set aside time to think about your research project what it means, and think outside the box as you never know what you might find!


10 immutable laws of email etiquette

Dog with mouth open

Mind your manners!

There are so many rules in life.

Don’t chew with your mouth open. Don’t eat after 7.30pm (you can thank Oprah for that one). And the wardrobe-limiting – blue and green should never be seen unless there’s something in between.

Nobody can follow all the rules. You have to pick and choose ones that resonate with you.

Whether you are partial to a midnight snack in your blue and green onesie, or you chow down at a work function with your mouth open, you have to consider which ones may have a negative impact on your life.

Let’s be honest, wearing an olive green blouse under a navy suit will hardly hold you back at work. Unless you work at Vogue, and even then, it could be perceived as fashion-forward.

And it’s the same with email. There are some email etiquette rules that you should absolutely follow so you don’t horrify your colleagues with your awful email manners.

Then there are others which you can flagrantly break with no consequences. For instance, a clear subject line is super helpful, but if you forget to write one, it’s no biggie (or is it? You tell me).

And if you happen to overuse exclamation marks in a friendly email to a colleague, they’ll know you’re just enthusiastic, and not childish and unprofessional.

So what are the email etiquette rules you should absolutely follow?

Tim Sanders discusses the 12 immutable laws of email etiquette in a video series on Books24/7 (yes, there are videos in the popular eBook database). Here’s 10 of his immutable laws:

  1. 1.  Don’t give bad news over email
  2. 2.  Don’t copy an email over someone’s head
  3. 3.  Stamp out ‘reply to all’
  4. 4.  Think before you forward
  5. 5.  Never pre-address an email
  6. 6.  Don’t send an email at unprofessional hours
  7. 7.  Don’t write War and Peace over email
  8. 8.  Break the thread with a phone call
  9. 9.  Don’t send an email to someone that you could hit with a rock (figuratively-speaking)
  10. 10. Don’t send massive attachments (without warning)

To access the video, search for ’email etiquette series’ in Books24/7.


Our first Human Library was a success!

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Nathan campus library hosted our very first Human Library event on Wednesday 24 May 2017 and it was a huge success!

Human Library is a worldwide movement promoting equity and diversity. It is about providing a safe space and building a positive framework for conversations that can challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue.

People get labelled, it is about taking those labels, tearing them apart and hearing the story behind the person. It is about having open and honest conversations that can lead to greater acceptance, tolerance and social cohesion in the community.

We provided 20 Human Books to borrow, all with different ‘labels’, from Activist and Adopted to Muslim and Refugee. Readers were able to borrow a book for a 15-minute slot. They asked questions, and listened, recognising that the Human Book is not just a label, but they had a story to tell. They are so much more.

We hoped to provide a space to enable social and cultural connection between people, while recognising our differences.

We recognise that no ‘book’ ever has a single story, and our identities are complex. We do not want to ‘interpret’ our books: we want our ‘human books’ to ‘speak for themselves’, and to tell their own stories.

Staff and students came to borrow a ‘human book’ and went away feeling empowered through conversation, with the desire to continue to confront stereotypes and discrimination.

One of our books said: ‘I got to meet interesting people who also had interesting stories. I got to dispel a few myths and provide a few insights. My favourite part was interacting with my Readers – their questions were genuine, honest and engaging’.

Our Human Library event is over for this trimester, but we want you to continue to share your stories with each other: we believe that conversations can help spark social change!

You can watch the event on YouTube.

Read the rest of this entry »


How to use Endnote in 5 minutes

Are you new to Endnote? Check out the Endnote Training channel on YouTube for helpful videos.

You can watch videos such as How to use Endnote in 5 minutes, What’s new in Endnote X8, and Endnote Basic and Online: Installing the Plug-Ins.

The video on How to use Endnote in 5 minutes was uploaded in December last year and provides a quick overview of the most popular features in Endnote for Windows.

Don’t worry Mac users, there’s also a video for you. It’s called How to use Endnote in 6 minutes. Apparently, it takes an extra minute to learn Endnote on a Mac. Sorry.

The How to use Endnote videos for both Mac and Windows take you through the essentials of Endnote, including how to:

  • Import a reference from a database
  • Create a custom group
  • Find Full Text to download PDFs for references
  • Insert a reference in a Word document
  • Format a bibliography
  • Add page number to a citation

Endnote is Griffith University’s recommended bibliographic management software.

Windows users, you can access Endnote on your staff computer by simply going to the Windows start button and selecting Installable Applications. Mac users, you’ll need to download and install the program from the Software Download Service on Google Drive.

You can also install Endnote on your personal computer (for free!). You can find comprehensive instructions for both Mac and Windows on Griffith Library’s Endnote webpage.

Want a face-to-face Endnote training session? You can attend a workshop run by Griffith University Library. Visit the Library Workshops webpage to find the next available session. All staff are welcome to attend but preference will be given to Higher Degree Research (HDR) candidates. Register now!