What can you do in August to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 5 (31 July – 4 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 1/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 3/8 9:30am Online research survey tool N53 1.50 Nathan
Fri 4/8
1:00pm
Academic writing expectations at the HDR level S07 2.18 South Bank

 

Week 6 (7 August – 11 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 7/8 10:00am Endnote S02 3.13 South Bank
Wed 9/8 1:00pm Managing information resources and writing your literature review G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 7 (14 August – 18 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 14/8 10:00am Build and leverage your research profile N53 1.49 Nathan
Fri 18/8 10:00am Strategic publishing G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 8 (21 August – 25 August)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 22/8 10:00am Endnote N53 1.50 Nathan
Wed 23/8 1:00pm Developing your academic argument G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 9 (28 August – 1 September)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 28/8 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Thu 31/8 10:00am Managing information resources and writing your literature review
N53 1.51
Nathan

Conduct your research at Westfield Garden City

Conduct your research at Westfield Garden City

Do you need to conduct a survey, focus group or other research activity that requires access to a broad cross section of the general community?

Reserve the Learning Space! The Learning Space is a community partnership between Westfield Garden City and Griffith University.

Located on level 2, Westfield Garden City, you can conduct your research in a space that gives you access to Garden City’s 17 million visitors per year.

You can reserve the Learning Space on Thursdays from 10am to 1pm to set up survey stations, focus groups or other research activities.

As this data collection point is in a shopping centre, it is better suited to research projects seeking a general demographic.

And the good news is your research activity will not go unnoticed. Learning Centre staff work with Westfield’s marketing team to promote the activities on a weekly basis.

There will be temporary signage and staff on hand to encourage potential participants to visit you in the Learning Space.

Participants will also be offered a free coffee, with no costs to you or your research team.

Apply to use the Learning Space now.


A quick Q&A with Professor Kathy Andrews

Professor Kathy Andrews

Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery (GRIDD), Professor Kathy Andrews discusses her career, research tips and writing a children’s book.

1. What did you want to be when you were growing up?
I wanted to be so many things when I was growing up! An artist, an author and a scientist. In the end, I was able to mix some of these things together into one great job. Being a scientist is very creative and involves not only solving interesting questions but also communicating your findings to other scientists and the public.

2. Tell us about a previous job (work experience/volunteer work) that you’ve had.
My first job was wrapping presents at Christmas time in a department store!

3. Which 3 apps do you use the most on your mobile device?
iBooks (because I read constantly), Notes (to remind myself of things) and Twitter (still getting used to this one)

4. Which 5 celebrities would you invite to your ultimate dinner party?
That’s a hard one. If my daughter was involved, I would have to say five members of the Firebirds netball team!

5. Tell us about your favourite fictional character.
I don’t have particular favourites, but I am quite taken by the elven characters in Lord of the Rings.

6. What’s the best thing about your current role?
The best thing about my current role is the diversity of things that I am involved in. I work with fantastic staff and students on exciting research projects focused on developing new medicines for malaria, teach undergraduate students about infectious diseases and also talk to people in the community about how great science is.

7. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I hope that in five years I will have developed a new type of antimalarial drug. Fingers crossed!

8. What’s been the highlight of your career so far?
The highlight of my career really is in seeing my amazing research students graduate and go on to do wonderful things with their lives and careers. Very rewarding!

9. You are involved in Griffith’s That’s Rad Science project. Tell us about that.
I have always been involved in science communication and in 2016 I decided to try something new that also combined my skills in project management and writing. I wanted to inspire as many children as possible by telling them about the amazing worlds of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). I started That’s RAD! Science with the vision of producing a series of 12 books authored by Queenslanders working in STEM areas. The aim is to distribute the books widely to primary school children and interest them in STEM from an early age. I am authoring the first book about parasites (think pet poo parasites, scratchy head lice, and malaria mini-vampire parasites!)

10. What wise advice do you have for new researchers?
Make sure you find something you are passionate about to work on!

11. What’s the best resource you’ve discovered in your Griffith University Library?
The best Griffith University Library resource has to be the ability access online journal articles. When I started as a scientist, I often had to order articles and wait several weeks for them to arrive by post!

12. Can you give us your 3 best research tips?
Take detailed notes, set aside time to think about your research project what it means, and think outside the box as you never know what you might find!


What can you do in July to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to the calendar.

Week 1 (3 July – 7 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Thu 6/7 1:00pm Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

Week 2 (10 July – 14 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 11/7 10:00am Managing your research data G10 2.09 Gold Coast
Fri 14/7 10:00am Academic writing expectations at the HDR level N53 1.51 Nathan

 

Week 3 (17 July – 21 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 17/7 10:00am Endnote N53 1.49 Nathan
Wed 19/7 1:00pm Academic writing expectations at the HDR level G10 2.25 Gold Coast

 

Week 4 (24 July – 28 July)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tue 25/7 9:30am Online research survey tool G10 2.04 Gold Coast
Wed 26/7 10:00am Developing your academic argument N53 1.51 Nathan
Thu 27/7 1:00pm Build and leverage your research profile G10 2.09 Gold Coast

How to find funding for your research

Are you looking for a grant, fellowship, scholarship, or award to fund your research? There is a myriad of grant opportunities open to Griffith researchers, ranging from internal grant schemes to external funding.

Check out the Griffith University, Office for Research, Funding Opportunities website to keep on top of upcoming prospects.

You can also access the Research Professional grants database. It’s an online database of research funding opportunities and a source of international research policy and practice news.

If you set up a personal profile in Research Professional, you can receive automatic email alerts from the database. You can also create a personal funding opportunities calendar, save popular searches and see details of past awards from a number of funders.

The database allows you to manage and distribute funding opportunities to your Centre, Institute or Group. Discipline specific funding opportunities can be managed for distribution to members through saved searches, newsletter creation and calendar updates.

Simply, nominate a staff member to manage the membership and generate the tailored content via defined searches.

Need help? The Office for Research, Funding Opportunities website has resources which show you how to navigate Research Professional, locate funding opportunities and set up email alerts.

The Office for Research also provides specific local training for Centres, Institutes and Groups. Contact Joanne Biles or Rhiannon Campbell to organise a training session.

Have a look at the Research Professional grants database today.


A quick Q&A with Dr Campbell Fraser

Dr Campbell Fraser

Griffith University, Department of International Business and Asian Studies, Senior Lecturer, Dr Campbell Fraser discusses his career, research tips and organ trafficking.

1. What did you want to be when you were growing up?
At the age of 4, growing up in Glasgow, Scotland, I wanted to be a “bin man”, what would now be known as a refuse collector. The reason – the Glasgow “bin men” drove around in big blue trucks. I befriended my local bin men and they used to take me with them on their rounds – so every Thursday I got to ride in the big blue truck. Would never be allowed now!

2. Tell us about a previous job (work experience/volunteer work) that you’ve had.
My first job was as a sausage maker. I worked with some really interesting characters in that job –  a real education!  From there I went into banking, before going on to uni full time.

3. Which 3 apps do you use the most on your mobile device?
The BBC news– that is where I first go to in the morning when I wake up, Gmail app, and Washington Post – I am now an avid follower of US politics since the 2016 election result.

4. Which 5 celebrities would you invite to your ultimate dinner party?
I’d love to see what great leaders of the past would make of today’s politicians. So I would have Winston Churchill, Robert Menzies and Mahatma Gandhi on one side of the table, with Donald Trump and Rodrigo Duterte on the other. Now that would make an interesting dinner party!

5. Tell us about your favourite fictional character.
Simon Templar – AKA “The Saint”, by Leslie Charteris. A great series of adventure novels adapted for TV in the 1960s. Escapism at its best.

6. What’s the best thing about your current role?
Without a doubt, it is the people I get to meet.  By investigating organ trafficking, I have the privilege to work with some amazing people – people who save lives day in, day out. Often working on a shoestring budget in some of the poorest and dangerous areas of the world; these are truly remarkable people.

7. What sparked your interest in human/organ trafficking?
A few years ago, I had kidney failure and spent a year on dialysis before I received the ultimate gift of a donor kidney. I met a number of people involved in the international organ trade at this time, and as they say, one thing led to another…

8. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I would be very happy if I am still able to do exactly what is I am doing now.  My colleagues and I have made major progress in the fight against human trafficking, but much work remains to be done.

9. What’s been the highlight of your career so far?
This year, I was invited by the Pope to the Vatican to present my work, and this has led to several invitations to speak around the world. While these are certainly highlights, the biggest highlight has been knowing that we are making a difference in the lives of some of the poorest people on our planet.  That is more important than anything else.

10. Tell us about your current research.
I’m currently investigating the links between organ trafficking in the Middle East and terrorism funding. I am working in collaboration with colleagues from the US government in Washington DC. This is taking my work in a whole new direction.

11. What wise advice do you have for new researchers?
Follow your nose and see where it leads you. Try to find a topic that is poorly understood, and that will maximise your scope. Never give up. If your research topic is important to you, then it is important, regardless of what others may tell you.

12. What’s the best resource you’ve discovered in your Griffith University Library?
Online journal access has fundamentally changed the way academics work. I can now be in a village in the Philippines and access the Griffith Library by VPN on my device. This is a huge timesaver. Griffith Library has online access to a vast number of journals relevant to my work, and I wouldn’t be able to function without it.

13. Can you give us your 3 best research tips

  • Be very cautious of information you find online – I would say probably 75% of reports of organ trafficking found online is false, and is written to promote political objectives. I always make sure I meet the people involved so I can obtain the information at the source. Understand the difference between truths, and reports which are based on a true story!
  • Remain courteous and professional when conducting investigations. On occasions, I have had to interview people-traffickers and their brokers, and no matter how much disgust I have for them, I have to keep a professional demeanour.  Always take the high road, you never know when you might need someone’s help in the future. You want to show Griffith University in a good light!
  • Always think of ways to increase your audience. The media is a great way to bring your research findings to a wider range of people who don’t read academic journals. Think about what would make a great story – and learn how to pitch it to journalists. This will increase the impact of your research, and get you noticed. Journalists are always on the lookout for exciting stories that their readers are likely to click on!

What can you do in June to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our series of Higher Degree Research (HDR) Workshops. They are targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.

All staff and students are welcome to attend these workshops but preference will be given to HDR candidates. Once you have registered you will receive an email confirmation, please select add to calendar.

Study Week (29 May – 2 June)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
1/6 10:00am Copyright, plagiarism and publishing integrity G10 2.25 Gold Coast
2/6 1:00pm Track, measure and demonstrate impact G10 2.09 Gold Coast

 

Exam Week 1 (5 June – 9 June)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
7/6 10:00am Endnote G10 2.04 Gold Coast

 

 Student Vacation (19 June – 23 June)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
21/6 10:00am Endnote N53 1.49 Nathan