What to do when retiring your old mobile device

Have you recently upgraded your mobile phone, or are you thinking about it in the near future?

With the continual innovation of new technology, the life expectancy of your mobile device can be as short as three years before you need to update – or maybe you elect to update sooner to stay on top of the newest releases.

So what should you do with your old device? Recycle it, of course!

Griffith is committed to finding sustainable solutions for our end of life electronics as part of our E-Waste and Sustainability campaign. To facilitate this, there are E-Waste recycling stations at each campus library, as well as the EcoCentre and various student centres.

However, just as you wouldn’t leave a public computer without logging out of all your personal accounts, don’t forget to remove your personal data from your mobile device before disposing of it!

Lately, there has been an increase in the number of phones being dropped off to be recycled that still have access to the owner’s highly confidential data: private text messages, personal photos, online accounts and even banking passwords!  

To avoid the risk of having your accounts hacked or money stolen, it’s important to ensure you remove your personal data before your recycle.

Simply follow the checklist below, then get recycling!

  • Back up the device
  • Manually remove any personal information (a factory reset does not necessary delete all personal information)
  • Log out of online accounts  (iCloud, iTunes, App Store, Google Play, etc) and social media (Facebook, Instagram)
  • Manually turn off any ‘find my phone’ applications (i.e. Find my iPhone and Android Device Manager)
  • Unpair any devices such as Car Media or iWatch
  • Perform a factory reset
  • Remove your SIM card

For further information on the data management of your device before recycling visit the Recycling Devices webpage, or take a look at the tips on the Mobile Muster, Apple iOS, or Android websites.


These are the 25 worst passwords of 2016

Halloween has recently passed. A day where we are reminded of frights, scares and horrors. While this is an American-centric holiday, there are some mortifying things a lot closer to home. Like cybersecurity.

We know, it doesn’t sound that scary, does it? Well not as scary as Keeping up with the Kardashians reaching 10 years of air time and 14 seasons. But it can be. Our online world is wrought with potential viruses and hackers.

A large part of keeping your online world secure is passwords. But with so many accounts, come so many passwords. Some are fine – set once and it’s it. Some will prompt you to change at set periods (and they may not all align).

For example, the security-conscious folk at Griffith regularly makes us change our passwords to ensure our account is safe from hackers. And we totally appreciate the automated prompt to stay on top of our online-security. But let’s be honest, it’s hard having to think of a password that is different from your previous 13, has at least six characters, a mixture of letters and numbers… shall we go on? So inevitably, you may choose a password that is too simple, weak or just plain obvious.

So SplashData made a naughty list; the 25 worst passwords for 2016. The list is based on more than 5 million passwords that leaked online last year, and posted for sale online (see, we told you it was scary!).

Is your password on the list?

  1. 1. 123456
  2. 2. password
  3. 3. 12345
  4. 4. 12345678
  5. 5. football
  6. 6. qwerty
  7. 7. 1234567890
  8. 8. 1234567
  9. 9. princess
  10. 10. 1234
  11. 11. login
  12. 12. welcome
  13. 13. solo
  14. 14. abc123
  15. 15. admin
  16. 16. 121212
  17. 17. flower
  18. 18. passw0rd
  19. 19. dragon
  20. 20. sunshine
  21. 21. master
  22. 22. hottie
  23. 23. loveme
  24. 24. zaq1zaq1
  25. 25. password1

Read the full article in Network World, available via the ProQuest database.

How safe is your password? For tips on keeping your password secure, go to Griffith University’s Passwords page.


Have a staff Mac? Update it to stay cyber-safe!

Our Office of Digital Solutions staff have been working hard over the trimester break to ensure all computers are up-to-date and protected against cyber threats.

In late October, we introduced Parallels Mac Management technology for all staff Mac computers (that’s 1500 to be exact!).

Parallels Mac Management enables compliance and control of our Mac fleet centrally, enforcing security policies and enabling image deployment and software management. The technology also provides inventory and reporting tools for managers and allows users to browse and install approved Mac applications.

Mac computers are not immune to viruses or cyber attacks. Parallels Mac Management enables us to quickly deploy critical software updates to your computer, ensuring that your data and privacy are protected.

So, what do you need to do?

Well, if you received a Mac computer prior to 26 September 2017, you’ll need to install the App. To do so, follow the installation steps here.

*Note: If you have received a new Mac computer since 26 September 2017 no action is required and your computer is up to date.

For further installation queries contact the IT Service Centre.


What to do when retiring your old mobile device

Have you recently upgraded your mobile phone, or are you thinking about it in the near future?

With the continual innovation of new technology, the life expectancy of your mobile device can be as short as three years before you need to update – or maybe you elect to update sooner to stay on top of the newest releases.

So what should you do with your old device? Recycle it, of course!

Griffith is committed to finding sustainable solutions for our end of life electronics as part of our E-Waste and Sustainability campaign. To facilitate this, there are E-Waste recycling stations at each campus library, as well as the EcoCentre and various student centres.

However, just as you wouldn’t leave a public computer without logging out of all your personal accounts, don’t forget to remove your personal data from your mobile device before disposing of it!

Lately, there has been an increase in the number of phones being dropped off to be recycled that still have access to the owner’s highly confidential data: private text messages, personal photos, online accounts and even banking passwords!  

To avoid the risk of having your accounts hacked or money stolen, it’s important to ensure you remove your personal data before your recycle.

Simply follow the checklist below, then get recycling!

  • Back up the device
  • Manually remove any personal information (a factory reset does not necessary delete all personal information)
  • Log out of online accounts  (iCloud, iTunes, App Store, Google Play, etc) and social media (Facebook, Instagram)
  • Manually turn off any ‘find my phone’ applications (i.e. Find my iPhone and Android Device Manager)
  • Unpair any devices such as Car Media or iWatch
  • Perform a factory reset
  • Remove your SIM card

For further information on the data management of your device before recycling visit the Recycling Devices webpage, or take a look at the tips on the Mobile Muster, Apple iOS, or Android websites.


Protect your digital life on your mobile device

wb-it-security-mobile-grey

When you lend your mobile device, did you know you’re also sharing your internet account, email and Facebook?

And do really want to give your colleague access to your Facebook account? They’ll just post cringe-worthy selfies from your camera roll or startling revelations about your embarrassing celebrity crush (which is obvs completely false).

Or even worse. They could use up all your internet data to watch cats being funny on YouTube. Which is fine, but only if you got to see the furry feline shenanigans as well.

How does this happen? Well, you’re connected to the Griffith Wi-Fi on your mobile device, right? You’ll notice that once you’ve signed in, you are never asked to sign in again. It’s just so convenient to have it connect automatically when you’re on campus.

But it also means that when you share your mobile phone, tablet or laptop with your colleague, all their internet use will be billed and logged against you!

And don’t forget, you’re probably logged into all your social media and email accounts as well.

Which means they can not only post to your Facebook (as you), but also to Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter. And just for kicks, they could swipe right for all of Tinder.

Now, your friends and colleagues are probably too responsible to be irresponsible with your digital life. They would never prank post on your social media, use all your internet data, or mess with your email.

But if they do. Just remember, we told you so.

For advice on how to stay safe online, visit the Griffith University IT Security web page.


5 of the worst computer viruses ever

Have you ever had a computer virus? They aren’t very nice.

They can break your computer, delete your files or steal your personal information. And you can inadvertently infect your friends and family with the virus (well, not them directly, their computer).

Michael Aranda takes us through the 5 of the worst computer viruses ever in a YouTube video by SciShow. Remember the Melissa Virus? What about the not-so-lovely I love You Virus? They both make the cut.

Watch the video to see how quickly they spread, how many people they affected and the amount of damage they did.

How can you avoid getting a virus? Michael recommends that you:

  • Install an antivirus program
  • Don’t click on suspicious links or emails from Nigerian princes
  • Keep your computer operating system and programs updated with the latest security patches

Installing an antivirus program doesn’t have to cost a fortune. Actually, it doesn’t have to cost you anything at all. As a Griffith staff member, you can access Symantec Endpoint Protection on your device for FREE.

Symantec Endpoint Protection is a leading antivirus and security solution for desktop devices. It is designed to ‘protect against advanced threats with powerful, layered protection backed by industry-leading security intelligence’. See the Symantec website for system requirements.

You can access Symantec Endpoint Protection via the Software Download Service (SDS) on your Griffith University Google Drive account. Head to the Software Services website for handy instructions on accessing home use software.


Stop your iPhone from being hacked

iphone

Download the latest security patch released by Apple! On Thursday 25 August, Apple released an urgent update to its operating system due to a malware attack.

Apple issued a global update to their iOS software after a sophisticated piece of malware was found to be able to compromise any iPhone in the world.

The malware gives attackers the ability to steal information from your phone, intercept calls and SMS, view emails, contacts and other applications. After confirming the vulnerability, Apple developed a patch that is deployed with its latest iOS update (9.3.5)

After confirming the vulnerability, Apple developed a patch that is deployed with its latest iOS update (9.3.5), and are advising people to download this fix immediately.

For instructions on how to update your iOS device, please refer to the Apple website.