Access to The Chronicle of Higher Education

You’re always switched on!

As a Griffith academic, you are ahead of the curve with relevant news, information and trends in higher education.

But, just in case you sometimes fall behind the eight ball, we’ve got you covered.

Griffith University Library provides you with unlimited, premium access to the entire Chronicle of Higher Education, including:

  • daily news and advice columns
  • in-depth articles about current issues faced by universities
  • an archive of previously published content
  • vibrant discussion forums
  • career-building tools such as online CV management
  • data and analysis on the latest higher education trends, statistics, and salaries
  • a huge range of e-newsletters.

You can access the The Chronicle of Higher Education from any location, any device, any time. Simply, create a free account and login to access premium content:

  1. Go to www.chronicle.com
  2. Click on ‘Log In’ in the top right corner
  3. Click on ‘Create an Account’
  4. Use your Griffith email address and choose a password

Happy browsing.


Microsoft Paint lovers rejoice!

Microsoft Paint – for some of you, an icon of your childhood.

Our world almost fell apart when Microsoft announced earlier this year that they’re no longer supporting Microsoft Paint, after 32 glorious years! There was an outpouring of grief on the internet when they announced they were killing the classic program. Some of us let go of our inner geek and protested fiercely; our lives would never be the same.

Many glorious hours were spent creating masterpieces (they were masterpieces, right?), stopping only occasionally to play solitaire or minesweeper. MS Paint was there for us to play on as a child, even before we even understood what the internet was.

The September issue of PC World brought us some overwhelmingly wonderful news: Microsoft will save Microsoft Paint, making it a downloadable app. All Hail!

To add even more awesome to the news, it will be available for free!

Read the full article in the September issue of PC World, which is available to Griffith students and staff via the EBSCO database:


Access primary source collections for the humanities and social sciences

Are you a social sciences or humanities researcher? Read on!

We’re sure you know: primary sources are important for research. They provide direct or firsthand evidence about an event, object, person, or work of art.

To assist with your research, over time, Griffith Library has acquired digital primary source collections for the humanities and social sciences. These include:

Eighteenth Century Journals Portal
Digitally access unique and rare 18th century journals. Eighteenth Century Journals Portal brings together rare journals printed between c.1685 and 1835, and illuminates all aspects of eighteenth-century social, political and literary life.

Mass Observation Sections I, II. III, IV
Mass Observation Online covers the original Mass Observation project, the bulk of which was carried out from 1937 until the mid-1950s, offering an unparalleled insight into everyday life in Britain during these transformative years.

Empire Online
Empire online has been developed to encourage undergraduates, postgraduates, academics and researchers to explore colonial history, politics, culture and society. Material in the collection spans five centuries, charting the story of the rise and fall of empires; from the explorations of Columbus, Captain Cook, and others, right through to de-colonisation in the second half of the twentieth century and debates over American Imperialism.

Slavery, Abolition and Justice 1490-2007
Access digital facsimiles of printed and manuscript materials relevant to trans-Atlantic slavery and abolition, as well as materials relating to slavery today, desegregation and social justice. Topics covered include the African Coast, the Middle Passage, the varieties of slave experience, religion, revolts, abolition and legislation. The facsimile documents are presented alongside contextual essays contributed by leading academics in the field. You’ll also find case studies from America, the Caribbean, Brazil, and Cuba.


8,900 new ebooks available from Springer


Calling all engineering, computer science, medicine and, biomedical and life science gurus! You can now access even more comprehensive bodies of scientific, medical and technical research documentation.

Our Scholarly Resource Services have recently enabled access to over 8 900 titles published from 2015 to 2017 in the following Springer Collections:

  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Medicine

You can check out ebooks on robotics, cancer nanotheranostics, earthquake/tsunami engineering, gamification, self-aware computing systems, nanotechnology, and so much more. I can feel my IQ increasing just reading the titles!

To access these, simply:

  • Jump onto the library website
  • Click inside the library catalogue, to filter the search to books on the left hand side, and then electronic only from the drop down menu
  • Type in your search terms in the main text field. Use the keywords “springer”, and one of the collection names names listed above, for example “engineering” and start browsing.

Now you’re ready to start reading!


What you need to know about accessing eBooks

What you need to know about accessing eBooks

Griffith has purchased or subscribed to over 300,000 eBooks on various platforms. ProQuest Ebook Central has become Griffith’s largest platform.

Now, we are sure you and your students are loving how accessible eBooks are. Students can access them 24/7 from anywhere with internet connectivity (and a mobile device, of course!).

But we understand you also have concerns about eBooks and ironically, this is mostly to do with access.

So every now and again, your students may not be able to access an eBook. This is probably because the eBook has a user limit.

For example, we may only have subscribed to three copies of that particular eBook, and three other students are currently using it.

There is a workaround to this problem. Tell your students not to leave their exam or assignment prep to the night before. Every person and their dog will be trying to access the same eBook at that time. There will be access issues for sure!

Ask them to try and access the book at different times of the day. We recommend early morning!

There are also limits to copying, printing and downloading our eBooks.

Now, with ProQuest Ebook Central, students can copy 20% of an eBook within a 24-hour period. And they can print or download 40% of an eBook’s total pages within a 24-hour period. That’s because ProQuest Ebook Central resets every 24 hours.

This screenshot shows the user limit for an eBook and the number of pages that remain each day to copy, print or chapter download.

If you or your students experience problems with access to our eBooks, please email library@griffith.edu.au and your request will get through to the right people.

Do you want to use an eBook for your course? The easiest way is to fill out the Suggest a Purchase form.


Does torture work?

Photo of hands in handcuffs

Well, you’ll have to read John W. Schiemann’s book to find out.

In his 2015 publication, Does Torture Work?, Schiemann ‘examines whether interrogational torture is effective in obtaining valuable information and at what cost in terms of torture’s brutality and frequency’ (taken from abstract).

According to the abstract, the book ‘draws on historical accounts, previously secret CIA documents in the war on terrorism, and the proposals advanced by torture proponents to build a game theoretic model of interrogational torture’.

‘Illustrating the model outcomes with narratives from Pinochet’s Chile to Algeria to the use of enhanced interrogation techniques against Al Qaeda operatives at CIA black sites, the book compares the results of the model with proponent benchmarks on information reliability, torture frequency, and torture severity’.

In his book, Schiemann shows that ‘interrogational torture fails to reliably generate valuable information but will be both more frequent and more brutal than proponents expect and are willing to accept. Having shown that interrogational torture is ineffective, the book then demonstrates just why and how it fails’.

You can read this book online via the Oxford Scholarship Online: Political Science database.

The database contains the full text and abstracts of classic and newly published Oxford books in the areas of political science – from Comparative Politics to Political Theory, International Relations to European Union Studies.


More than 400 free eBooks are now in JSTOR

Free eBooks? Yes, please! Thanks to a new partnership with ANU Press, JSTOR’s Open Access eBook Collection has expanded to more than 500 titles.

The 409 peer-reviewed research publications from ANU are available in an open access model on the JSTOR platform.

They cover a wide range of disciplines and did we mention they are completely free for anyone to read? Here’s a small selection to tempt you:

Bayesian Methods for Statistical Analysis
By Borek Puza (2015)
Bayesian Methods for Statistical Analysis is a book on statistical methods for analysing a wide variety of data. The book consists of 12 chapters, starting with basic concepts and covering numerous topics, including Bayesian estimation, decision theory, prediction, hypothesis testing, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, finite population inference, biased sampling and nonignorable nonresponse.

Change!: Combining Analytic Approaches with Street Wisdom
Edited by Gabriele Bammer (2015)
Change happens all the time, so why is driving particular change generally so hard? Why are the outcomes often unpredictable? Are some types of change easier to achieve than others? Are some techniques for achieving change more effective than others. Knowledge about change is fragmented and there is nowhere in the academic or practice worlds that provide comprehensive answers to these and other questions. Every discipline and practice area has only a partial view and there is not even a map of those different perspectives. The purpose of this book is to begin the task of developing a comprehensive approach to change by gathering a variety of viewpoints from the academic and practice worlds.

Planning and Managing Scientific Research: A guide for the beginning researcher
By Brian Kennett (2014)
This work is based on extensive scientific research and management experiences and is designed to provide an introduction to planning and managing scientific research for the beginning researcher. The aim is to build an understanding of the nature of scientific research, and the way in which research projects can be developed, planned and managed to a successful outcome. The book is designed to help the transition from being a member of a research team to developing a project and making them work and to provide a framework for future work.