What to do when retiring your old mobile device

Have you recently upgraded your mobile phone, or are you thinking about it in the near future?

With the continual innovation of new technology, the life expectancy of your mobile device can be as short as three years before you need to update – or maybe you elect to update sooner to stay on top of the newest releases.

So what should you do with your old device? Recycle it, of course!

Griffith is committed to finding sustainable solutions for our end of life electronics as part of our E-Waste and Sustainability campaign. To facilitate this, there are E-Waste recycling stations at each campus library, as well as the EcoCentre and various student centres.

However, just as you wouldn’t leave a public computer without logging out of all your personal accounts, don’t forget to remove your personal data from your mobile device before disposing of it!

Lately, there has been an increase in the number of phones being dropped off to be recycled that still have access to the owner’s highly confidential data: private text messages, personal photos, online accounts and even banking passwords!  

To avoid the risk of having your accounts hacked or money stolen, it’s important to ensure you remove your personal data before your recycle.

Simply follow the checklist below, then get recycling!

  • Back up the device
  • Manually remove any personal information (a factory reset does not necessary delete all personal information)
  • Log out of online accounts  (iCloud, iTunes, App Store, Google Play, etc) and social media (Facebook, Instagram)
  • Manually turn off any ‘find my phone’ applications (i.e. Find my iPhone and Android Device Manager)
  • Unpair any devices such as Car Media or iWatch
  • Perform a factory reset
  • Remove your SIM card

For further information on the data management of your device before recycling visit the Recycling Devices webpage, or take a look at the tips on the Mobile Muster, Apple iOS, or Android websites.


These are the 25 worst passwords of 2016

Halloween has recently passed. A day where we are reminded of frights, scares and horrors. While this is an American-centric holiday, there are some mortifying things a lot closer to home. Like cybersecurity.

We know, it doesn’t sound that scary, does it? Well not as scary as Keeping up with the Kardashians reaching 10 years of air time and 14 seasons. But it can be. Our online world is wrought with potential viruses and hackers.

A large part of keeping your online world secure is passwords. But with so many accounts, come so many passwords. Some are fine – set once and it’s it. Some will prompt you to change at set periods (and they may not all align).

For example, the security-conscious folk at Griffith regularly makes us change our passwords to ensure our account is safe from hackers. And we totally appreciate the automated prompt to stay on top of our online-security. But let’s be honest, it’s hard having to think of a password that is different from your previous 13, has at least six characters, a mixture of letters and numbers… shall we go on? So inevitably, you may choose a password that is too simple, weak or just plain obvious.

So SplashData made a naughty list; the 25 worst passwords for 2016. The list is based on more than 5 million passwords that leaked online last year, and posted for sale online (see, we told you it was scary!).

Is your password on the list?

  1. 1. 123456
  2. 2. password
  3. 3. 12345
  4. 4. 12345678
  5. 5. football
  6. 6. qwerty
  7. 7. 1234567890
  8. 8. 1234567
  9. 9. princess
  10. 10. 1234
  11. 11. login
  12. 12. welcome
  13. 13. solo
  14. 14. abc123
  15. 15. admin
  16. 16. 121212
  17. 17. flower
  18. 18. passw0rd
  19. 19. dragon
  20. 20. sunshine
  21. 21. master
  22. 22. hottie
  23. 23. loveme
  24. 24. zaq1zaq1
  25. 25. password1

Read the full article in Network World, available via the ProQuest database.

How safe is your password? For tips on keeping your password secure, go to Griffith University’s Passwords page.


Disaster Recovery testing

While some very lucky staff are off on trimester vacay, we’re taking the opportunity to complete the annual IT disaster recovery test. We’re putting our Scouts hat on, ‘Be Prepared’.

For those fortunate enough to be on the beach in Bali, you can continue sipping your cocktail knowing we’ve got your covered. You can trust that we’re on the ball, executing a fail-over test in the case of a major disaster.

The disaster recovery test is a major activity to ensure the University’s key information systems can be recovered and continue to operate in the event of a major disruption.

This year’s testing includes

  • A major site fail-over test simulating the loss of all in-house hosted systems. During this test period, access to all systems and associated links including access to the Griffith home page and internet will be unavailable.
  • Testing the fail-over capability of our critical telephone systems, student printing system and SharePoint document repository. During this test period, access to these systems could be interrupted.

When?

The date and times and subject to change (it’s always in the small print) but currently, the date and times are:

  1. Sunday 22 October 2017
  • In-house hosted systems (including internet and wi-fi access)
    8am – noon
  • Telephones, student printing and SharePoint
    8am – midnight

While this may cause some inconvenience, these tests are required and you will receive more information as the date gets closer.

For further information, please contact Sudath Wijeratne.  More information about scheduled maintenance for the remainder of 2017 is available in the Maintenance Calendar.


What to do when retiring your old mobile device

Have you recently upgraded your mobile phone, or are you thinking about it in the near future?

With the continual innovation of new technology, the life expectancy of your mobile device can be as short as three years before you need to update – or maybe you elect to update sooner to stay on top of the newest releases.

So what should you do with your old device? Recycle it, of course!

Griffith is committed to finding sustainable solutions for our end of life electronics as part of our E-Waste and Sustainability campaign. To facilitate this, there are E-Waste recycling stations at each campus library, as well as the EcoCentre and various student centres.

However, just as you wouldn’t leave a public computer without logging out of all your personal accounts, don’t forget to remove your personal data from your mobile device before disposing of it!

Lately, there has been an increase in the number of phones being dropped off to be recycled that still have access to the owner’s highly confidential data: private text messages, personal photos, online accounts and even banking passwords!  

To avoid the risk of having your accounts hacked or money stolen, it’s important to ensure you remove your personal data before your recycle.

Simply follow the checklist below, then get recycling!

  • Back up the device
  • Manually remove any personal information (a factory reset does not necessary delete all personal information)
  • Log out of online accounts  (iCloud, iTunes, App Store, Google Play, etc) and social media (Facebook, Instagram)
  • Manually turn off any ‘find my phone’ applications (i.e. Find my iPhone and Android Device Manager)
  • Unpair any devices such as Car Media or iWatch
  • Perform a factory reset
  • Remove your SIM card

For further information on the data management of your device before recycling visit the Recycling Devices webpage, or take a look at the tips on the Mobile Muster, Apple iOS, or Android websites.


Who has access to your Google Drive files and folders?

Painting of shocked person

Uh oh! Were you supposed to share that confidential document with all Griffith staff?

Sharing documents via Google Drive is a great way to collaborate with your colleagues, but it can also create some undesirable situations if sensitive information is inadvertently shared. And it’s easier to do than you might think.

Who said: ‘With great sharing power comes great responsibility?’ Was it Voltaire? Spider-Man? Winston Churchill? Theodore Roosevelt? Franklin D. Roosevelt? None of them! We will attribute this great (if somewhat slightly amended) quote to the Information Management Portfolio.

The nature of the content you share in Google Drive will dictate who you should share it with. Does your document contain personally identifiable data? Does it contain business-sensitive information such as passwords, security details, commercially sensitive details?

If so, please be aware that access to this information needs to be restricted and you need to take particular care in the management of your sharing settings for these documents.

Check out the How to change your sharing settings in Google Drive guide on the Information Management Communities Intranet site. It explains how to administer the file sharing permissions in Google Drive.

It is also worth remembering that Google Drive is great for collaboration but it is not a records management system. When you have finished collaborating on your document, it may need to be saved into a more appropriate repository for ongoing management.


How to protect your Google Apps account

Suspect suspicious activity? Contact Information Services on x55555

Suspect suspicious activity? Contact Information Services on x55555

Research data, personal information and sensitive documents are often the target of hackers who use this information for identity theft, financial fraud or a stepping stone to access other systems.  That’s why you need to take steps to protect your Google Apps account.

Griffith University staff and students are provided with a Google Apps account to communicate and collaborate. It is important to remain vigilant and be aware of any suspicious activity that may be occurring in this account. Read the rest of this entry »


These are the 25 worst passwords of 2015

passwords

Is your password on the naughty list?

We have all experienced the frustration of having to update our password for one of our gazillion computer accounts; email, Netflix, ASOS, Spotify, Instagram, PayPal, iTunes…

Then there are the passwords for uni. The security-conscious folk at Griffith Uni make us change our passwords regularly so we can keep our account safe from hackers. And we totally appreciate it! Who wants hackers reading your rejected Mills and Boon manuscript saved on your Google Drive?

But let’s be honest, it’s hard having to think of a password you haven’t used in the last 12 months. So inevitably, you may choose a password that is too simple, weak or just plain obvious (c’mon, have you ever used griffith for a uni password?).

So SplashData made a naughty list; the 25 worst passwords for 2015. The list is based on more than 2 million passwords that leaked online last year.

Check out the naughty list and see if any of your passwords are hacker-friendly. Here are a few offenders:

  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. qwerty
  4. login
  5. princess

Read the full article in this month’s issue of PC World, which is available to Griffith students and staff via the EBSCO database:

How safe is your password? For tips on keeping your password secure, go to Griffith University’s Secure passwords page.